Jiggety Jig

Jul. 8th, 2017 11:55 am
awanderingbard: (Default)
Back home from cottaging now! We had a super week. Ascii is getting old and I think she was a little confused while we were there, but the three walks a day and the screened in porch helped ease things for her. She came home and went to bed. :-D

I intended to do some writing while I was there, but I mostly just rested and recovered, which is fine, because that's what I was there to do. I had to come in to town one day for a doctor's appointment (they were squeezing me in, so it felt rude to say 'hey we're away, can we do this another time'). It was a specialist, and he's given me a new treatment plan which hopefully will help with my recent health issues. Basically, my menstrual cycles have gone completely out of whack and I've been pretty sick with it, but this should help me get back on track again. PCOS for the suck.

Anyway, it was great to get away and also nice to be back again. Hope everyone had a nice week and the Yanks had a good Independence Day!
awanderingbard: (Default)
We've safely arrived at the cottage, and there is excellent Wi-Fi, which we've been told is unlimited, so we can stream and everything, which is nice. It's pouring rain just at the moment, sort of a Canada Day tradition. I remember every year when I was little, we'd settle in for the big concert on Parliament Hill at night and every year it would start, then get get rained out, until they moved it to midday instead. We didn't attend any celebrations, so it doesn't matter much, and the weather up to now has been middling to fair, and travel days are wasted ones anyway, so it's not a big deal.

The new cottage is amazing, even better than the old one. The only downside is lack of dishwasher, which is countered by the inclusion of a bathtub, so swings and roundabouts, really. And as a super bonus, I don't have to sleep on the couch, which I did at the old cottage after the year it tried to kill me. I have a bedroom and a bed!

Anyway, all is well, and we're settled in nicely and should have a good week.
awanderingbard: (Default)
Tomorrow is Canada's 150th Birthday! Yay Canada! I'm going to be heading up to the cottage tomorrow, so I'm posting tonight in case I don't get a chance tomorrow morning. I'll be gone until the following Saturday. It's a new cottage this year since our old one decided not to allow dogs anymore and we couldn't leave poor Ascii girl at home. She's eleven years old and never been boarded, and it's not the time to start that.

So, the new cottage looks very pleasant, and it has Wi-Fi, but it's hard to know how good it will be, therefore I may be radio silent until I come back.

Anyway, I hope everyone has a happy and safe Canada Day and July 4th and week ahead, and I'll see you soon!
awanderingbard: (Default)
Mom and I watch When Calls the Heart on CBC, which is a super cheesy, but cute show (hot frontier mounties!) that we enjoy because this trend toward gritty/violent/dark television really isn't our jam. Despite it being a joint American/Canadian production, they've shown, I think five seasons in the States, but only two here. Season 3 started here last night.

Except, oh, by the way, there was a two-hour special that aired at Christmas of 2015 in the States and CBC either couldn't it show here or decided not to, for some reason. So that cliffhanger at the end of Season 2? Resolved in the special. New backstory for existing characters? Brought in during the special. New characters extremely relevant to the current season? Brought in during the special. This was covered in a brief 'previously on' at the start of the episode where Mom and I looked at each other and went 'I don't remember that'.

At first, we thought maybe we'd missed an episode, but I looked on the CBC website and they have everything up to stream, but nothing we hadn't seen. So I checked Wiki and discovered there'd been a special. Then I looked on Netflix, because it's up there, but they didn't have it either. Nor does iTunes. We managed to hunt down a very detailed recap from a fansite to fill in our missing knowledge and there were clips available elsewhere, so we got through well enough, but geez, CBC.

It's possible they aired it as a special at some point and we missed it, but the fact that the three legal resources I looked at didn't have it suggests that they didn't.

Of course, in the grand scheme of the world, this isn't important, but it is annoying, especially for a girl who just wants happy television as she recovers from six months of feeling like total crap and a previous year of feeling like semi-crap.

Thankfully MST3K on Netflix has been proving to be extremely enjoyable for a frazzled brain. :-D
awanderingbard: (Default)
I just finished the first season of Supergirl on Netflix yesterday, only to find that they don't have season two up yet. I'm aware it's a corny, iffy show, but I just am in the frame of mind for lighthearted, corny shows at the moment. So, I thought I'd Google to see when Netflix might be getting season two.

Well, it turns out that season two aired on The CW in America, rather than CBS, which is what season one aired on. Which explains why when I went to Global, which showed season one here in Canada, they sent me to Showcase, whom, I assumed picked it up after CBS/Global dropped it? I don't know. Anyway, they have the last three episodes of the season to stream, which doesn't help me. And apparently CW has a deal with Netflix to get their shows up eight days after airing, but in Canada, the other DC CW shows (Arrow, Flash, Legends of Tomorrow, etc) are on CraveTV, a different streaming app to which I am not subscribed because they don't have enough content I want to watch to make it worth my while and also I can't get it on my TV without a third party device that would cost me about $200, and, since Mom and I watch a lot of stuff together and you can't sync an iPad to another automatically, it's hard to find a way for us both to watch something if we can't get it up on the TV. But a quick browse suggests that they don't have Supergirl on there either, anyway.

So the question remains, will Canadian Netflix get season two? And when? Murdoch Mysteries switched channels halfway through its run and the first several seasons have disappeared from existence because no one seems to have the rights to them anymore, is this going to be another sort of limbo thing?

I can't find out about Supergirl because when I Google, all the results tell me it's up on the American Netflix. And I can't get American Netflix because licensing is stupid.

This could, of course, probably be solved in a dodgy manner, but I do my best to get content as legally as possible. I suppose there's always iTunes.
awanderingbard: (Default)
I'm doing another run on my family tree and spent yesterday trying to track down the husband of one of my dad's great-aunt's. My dad's side of the family is really hard to track because A) he knows nothing about family history, B) we have no one to ask on that side that might know, and C) they all had, like, five names and all of them chose to go by a random one that wasn't their first and D) no one before about 1930 knows when they were fucking born and decided it arbitrarily on each official document. Luckily, at least one branch lived in Quebec, where the records are awesome, provided you got married in the church and were baptized.

Anyway, all we knew about Great-Aunt's husband was his last name, via knowing one of their sons. So, I'm searching through all the censuses, trying to find where Gwen is living with him, variations on her name, etc., and getting nowhere. Out of curiosity, I switch to searching by the husband. As in, literally, all I have to search by is "Last Name, married This Last Name at some point". No birthdate, marriage date, location of birth, profession, nothing.

Their marriage record came up as the first listing.

So, Ancestry decided that Her Last Name married to His Last Name didn't match, but His Last Name Married to Her Last Name did. Now knowing his first name, I have discovered: the names of the other two sons, his parents' names, where he was born, what he did for a living, when he died, and found a random picture of my great-aunt posing with her future sister-in-law.

Mom and I watch Finding Your Roots on PBS, and she always complains about how the host goes on about what he did to finding the information, in what she feels to be an obnoxious fashion, but let me tell you, with how much work it sometimes is, I would be going 'guess what I freakin' did to find this!', too.

History!

May. 27th, 2017 01:11 pm
awanderingbard: (Default)
It's Canada's 150's birthday this year and CBC has been airing a series called "The Story of Us" on Sunday nights, which recounts the history of Canada from when the first settlers arrived up until modern times, taking interesting stories from various eras of history. Obviously, there's a lot left out, but it includes an incredible amount of stuff I had no idea about. It's done through reenacting scenes narrated over by various Canadian celebs, professors, writers, soldiers, and other people of note. Including a very silver-haired Paul Gross, who has aged very well.

I doubt it's available outside of Canada, but the on the off-chance you can watch it or live in Canada haven't seen it, the website is here. It finished a couple of weeks ago but Mum and I just finished last night due to practically all the television we watch in a week airing on Sunday night at the same time. We have DVR full of stuff to catch up on.

Some stuff I learned that I didn't know:
-- on at least three occasions, Canadians have won important battles by pretending there were more soldiers there than there were. These incidents are unrelated and spread out over hundreds of years; it's like it's just built into our DNA to go 'well, there's only three of us, but if we run around and make a lot of noise, we might be able to make them think there's more of us and they might surrender and we won't have to fight them'. And it worked on all three occasions. Including Vimy Ridge in WWI, where one soldier captured 96 Germans in a bunker by calling up to his few men above as though there were a platoon of them and ferrying them out in small, manageable groups once they'd been disarmed, so the few above weren't overwhelmed.
-- the most decorated sniper of WWI from Canada was a First Nations man named, Francis Pegahmagabow who was a total badass.
-- There was a black woman in 1940's Nova Scotia named Viola Desmond, who went to the cinema in different town and didn't know it was segregated there. She intended to buy a main floor ticket, but was given a mezzanine ticket since that was where you had to sit if you were black. She didn't know she had been given the different ticket and went to sit on the main floor, only to be euphemistically told she had the wrong ticket and to go upstairs, so she went back to correct the 'mistake' and exchange her ticket, only to be told she couldn't. She decided to sit on the main floor anyway and was arrested, put in jail overnight and charged a $26 fine for 'tax evasion' because the main floor ticket cost one cent more than the mezzanine ticket and she hadn't bought a main floor ticket. That's almost a $370 fine in today's money. Despite her challenging it, it was thrown out on a technically of the claim being filed after the 10 days time limit. She was officially pardoned in 2010, and is going to be the first Canadian woman to appear on a bank note in 2018.

Anyway, if you can find a way to watch the series, I highly recommend it. It's really fascinating and well done.

All the way through it I kept going "I bet my vampire lived through that".
awanderingbard: (Default)
A few months ago my mom was browsing a magazine at the physiotherapist when she found a recipe for really easy scones. My family has to deal with both my parents being diabetic and me having all the sensitivities ever (soy! tomatoes! potatoes! food colouring!), so we do a lot of baking and creative substitutions and I always get excited to have something new to eat that's easy to do, since my menu is so limited. We gave these a whirl and they're so, so good. Really light and fluffy, a little like a sweet soda bread with a less coarse crumb. The remind me of the baking powder biscuits you get at American KFCs. Or used to, I haven't eaten American KFC in about twenty years.

I'm not sure the original creator of the recipe, but it looks like a variation of a cream scone. It's very yummy.

Easy Scone Recipe
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tbsp baking powder
1 tbsp sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/2 cups whipping cream

Directions

Mix your dry ingredients together. Add whipping cream. Mix with fork until combined. Throw out on floured surface and roll dough out to 3/4" thickness. Cut with cutter of your choice. Bake at 400ºF/200C for 12-15 minutes until they are golden brown. Enjoy!

Variations
We usually do a double batch, since one dose makes enough for, say, having with stew, but we like to have extras for snack or breakfast. We've used table cream which has less fat and is cheaper without any noticeable difference in the taste or texture. Our family never puts salt in when we're baking, or only a few shakes, so you can leave that out if you want. I've also used half and half all-purpose and whole wheat flour in a pinch and it was still very yummy. The original recipe states you can toss dried fruit, cheese, chocolate chips, etc. in there to spice things up, but they are quite good on their own with just butter and/or jam. The other thing you can do if you don't have time to roll and cut is toss the dough in an 8x8 pan and cook for about 25-30 minutes to make a cake. The dough does rise a lot, so make sure your pan has room for growth.
awanderingbard: (Default)
We have a robin who makes her nest over our backyard porchlight every year. She's done the same this year, and she's been there for several weeks now, yelling at us each time we open the door to let Ascii in or out. It's funny, because you'll be somewhere in the house and hear the backdoor open followed by someone saying 'sorry Mrs Robin!'. The little robins have hatched now and Mrs Robin must have decided we're okay, because she's been feeding them right while we sit on the porch and watch. It's so cool to watch! I have a few pictures, but I can't get too close, so they aren't the best.

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The first one is her feeding the birds, the second is her sitting on the roof with a worm in her mouth, and the third is the nest with a little bird peeking out. There are four in there. When she comes to feed them, they all raise themselves up and tweedle at her and she drops the food in one of their mouths, then waits a second and one of them will stick it's butt in the air and poop and she takes it and flies over to the fence and drops it on the ground to keep the nest tidy. It's really interesting to watch.

In other news, I've been feeling pretty crap lately, healthwise, and when that happens, I like to learn new things to distract myself, so I've been learning how to colour in lineart. I still can't draw to save my life, but I do quite like colouring. Here's my first attempt, done with Photoshop Elements and my tablet:

bob.png

The lineart is by Hashm0sa here, and featured in a gallery on DA with free lineart to colour in. It's not perfect (my colouring) and I'm still working on how light works, but I'm happy with my progress. The sketch reminded me of Phryne Fisher of Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries's fame (Mum and I have been watching it on Netflix), so I coloured her to look like that.

In a very 1920's fashion, Mum has ordered me to 'convalesce' from my health woes for the past two years, which have been varied and yucky. And it's very hard to just sort of look after yourself and sleep if you're tired and go and sit on the porch and read your book and pretend like you're on holiday when there's stuff that you could be doing that would be helpful to other people, but you can't really do because you're so rundown. But I'm working on it. By watching robins and colouring in pictures.
awanderingbard: (Default)
So, 2017 is not getting off to a great start healthwise. I have another abscessed tooth. I have bad teeth. Even the dentist is like 'it's just genetics, you're doing the best you can'. I, of course, I had to start to feel the pain on a Thursday night (not last week, but the week before), when my dentist is always closed on Fridays. By Sunday, I was in so much pain my mom took me to Urgent Care, where one of her old doctor friends gave me antibiotics and a 'migraine cocktail' that took all the pain away, which was nice. Then on Monday, I saw the dentist, who, despite the fact there was a lump the size of a toonie on my palate, couldn't find anything wrong with my teeth except for a couple of caries. He added three more days to my antibiotics and made me an appointment for this coming Monday to have the cavities fixed and see how the rest was doing. I ran out of antibiotics yesterday morning and by this morning the lump was back, so I popped into the dentist on the way to see my GP about ANOTHER health issue (PCOS for the suck!). The dentist (the other one who works there) couldn't get an x-ray with my mouth the way it was, so he took a guess that my back molar was infected and opened it up and yes, it was. He drained it and the fistula and I have a temporary filling until Monday when the other dentist will finish the root canal.

Then, I went out to walk Ascii when I got home, and this random man came up to me in his car and leaned out the window to say 'hello' and I was like 'ooh, this could be bad'. But he just wanted to know if I wanted a rose. A girl was sitting in the passenger seat and they were driving around giving out roses to people on the street.

I really needed a rose today. Thank you, random stranger who, from the card on the rose, seems to be from some sort of real estate agency. You cheered me up immensely.
awanderingbard: (Default)
I was playing around with putting my Ancestry family tree info into FamilySearch (which is a free website, the one I was doing transcription work for in the summer), for fun, still trying to solve a few family mysteries. And I still haven't solved those mysteries, but I did discover new information about one branch of my family. Namely that we have at least two filles du roi in that branch!

Filles du roi ('The King's Daughters') are my favourite part of Canadian history. They were a group of women who came over to marry colonists in Canada, recruited by the French government due to a dearth of women to make babies and build the colony up with. Apparently, the men who settled in New France at the time were getting too friendly with the natives, which was not an 'acceptable' way to procreate. So, the government in France offered women a trousseau if they would go to New France and marry a colonist and be good daughters of France. Why would they want to do that? You know, go to the ungodly, far away lands full of scary things and people? Well, first of all, they gave you shit. You had a trunk full of so many petticoats and dresses and, I don't know, probably dinner plates and silverware. Which is more than poor women could bring to a marriage at home. And also, you can total freedom about who you could marry and the men were so desperate for wives that they were literally proposing to women before they got off the boats when they arrived. And you didn't have to accept a proposal. As long as you eventually married, you could decide which guy you wanted. Which was a HUGE thing, then, too. So, these badass women were like 'fuck France and my lot in life, I'm going to Canada to be sought after and have nice clothing'. And the circumstances were harsh there, so they had to be pretty hardy to survive. It was like, 'yay, I'm married! Oh, you're going to leave me alone in a cabin for the whole freezing winter while you go off and hunt fur? Where I'll be literally snowed in and won't be able to go outside until the thaw? And may have a baby with me? Groovy.'

I really like that period of history.

Also, in more modern news, I made Ascii a winter coat and she looks adorable in it:

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Pinwheels

Dec. 20th, 2016 04:10 pm
awanderingbard: (CP: Arthur is happy - a lot)
Pinwheels are a French-Canadian dessert, which we make every Christmas along with tourtiere (a meat pie). Most people around my neck of the woods (Ontario) haven't heard of pinwheels and are suspicious of them, like dude, it's literally just pie crust and sugar, what are you so freaked out about?

The 'official' name of pinwheels is 'Pets des Soeurs', which translates as 'Nun's Farts'. In my family, we've always called them pinwheels, or Soupirs des Soeurs (Nun's Sighs, which are actually a different pastry, I think). The gourmet supermarket here calls them Nun's Pastries. Take your pick, they are all delicious.

The way pinwheels are made is very free form, because they were originally created to use up extra pie dough, I think, so exact measurements are not a part of the process, you just use what you have. Here is the Bard Family Recipe/Guideline:

Things You Will Need:
1 pie crust (shortcrust, store bought is fine but make sure it's thawed a little if it's been frozen)
Some brown sugar (coconut sugar also works, Splenda brown sugar mix works, and we've used cinnamon sugar too, you just need something that will caramelize, so plain Splenda will not work)
Some butter
An oven
A pie plate (tin one from the frozen pie crusts is fine, glass ones are fine too, whatever you got)

Things You Do To Make Delicious Pinwheels:
1. Heat your oven to 375°F/190°C, or to whatever temperature you're using to bake whatever else you're making, do what you feel in your heart.
2. Either roll out your homemade pie dough in a flat circle or remove your frozen pie crust and make it a flat circle. If there are cracks, no sweat, you can pinch them closed later on, but if your frozen pie crust is super cracky, let it thaw a bit longer.
3. Butter your pie crust like you would butter bread. You want to have a pretty even, but not too thick layer. Let your heart guide you once more. Avoid the edges of the crust and mostly work in the centre.
4. Take your sugar or sugar-like substance and sprinkle it over the butter layer, smoothing it out to an even thickness.
5. Starting at one edge of the crust, roll it up like a cinnamon roll, so you have a spiral of filling inside a log.
6. Cut off the end pieces so the edges are even. Sample end pieces if so desired and it is not a health risk to do so.
7. Slice the log into slices of your desired thickness. Like, I don't know, half an inch? Your heart will know. They should look like little cinnamon rolls, and you can use your fingers to round them out if they are squashed on the bottom.
8. Arrange slices in pie tin/plate. They don't spread too much, so you can pack them in pretty close together.
9. Cook for ten minutes, or maybe five minutes if you're using a higher temperature. Check on them. Do they look golden and has the sugar melted and is bubbling? If yes, remove from oven. If no, cook until they do.
10. Let cool.
11. Eat the wonky ones as samples and serve the pretty ones to guests.

Here is a picture of some made with homemade crust (due to allergies, I couldn't have store bought for a while, but Tenderflake took their soy out, so yay for easier pinwheels this year!) Half-eaten tourtiere on the right. Click and it gets bigger.



Happy Holidays!
awanderingbard: (SW: Poe)
This was probably inevitable: Star Wars daemons. I’ve only done The Force Awakens-appearing characters (for now), and only humans, as I haven’t quite decided if all species have daemons or it’s just a human thing. Also, I’ve obviously used Earth animals, even though they probably don’t exist in the Star Wars galaxy, because otherwise...I wouldn’t have any animals to give anyone.


Anyway:


Daemons )

Hello!

Sep. 25th, 2016 10:43 am
awanderingbard: (MSC: Marianne and the Colonel (Austen))
Hello, flisters! I was just looking at my journal and realized I hadn't posted anything since July 14th, which is kind of mental, so I thought I should at least post and let everyone know I'm still alive. I've been battling migraines and kidney stones, and some PCOS hormonal things that may or may not be related to the formers, and I've just been kind of chilling and resting. Health issues aside, we're all a lot less stressed here than we were before Mom's surgery, due to her being in so much pain before and it being hard to watch and having to throw in more to cover for the things she couldn't do, and it's been so lovely to see her up and doing so much better, and we're all kind of exhausted in a good way. Exhausted from being so relaxed because we're not stressed, if that makes sense.

Mom is doing great now. She had a hard go recovering from the blood loss, and had some dizzy spells, but she's much better now and she and I have started doing yoga to help her recover and we're really enjoying it. I've also taken up crocheting, which I am now addicted to and cannot stop crocheting. Like, seriously, I spend multiple hours a day just browsing through Ravelry and playing around with our extensive stash of yarn to see what I can make, while also binge-watching Netflix.

Example of my early work:



I've recently finally mastered going back and forth in a row instead of in a circle, which is an accomplishment. Probably helped by the fact that I have a new type of glasses to correct my lazy eye, and now I feel like I'm seeing the world in HD.

Anyhoodle, I hope everyone is doing well, and I hope to be back to posting stories at some point. Love you all!
awanderingbard: (DW: Ten - 'brainy specs activate')
Due to fic research (I was trying to look up and find what info a WWII registration card had on it, and stumbled into a black hole), I ended up registering at Family Search, a free genealogy website run by the Latter Day Saints Church. Which means, I was invited to take part in their 72 in 72 Indexing project, which is a project to get 72 thousand people to index old document records for 72 hours (July 15-17, so starting tomorrow). Which sounded sort of fun, so I checked it out, and it turns out you can actually start indexing it at any point, and I'm having a lot of fun working on it. The 72 in 72 website is here, if you'd like to join in. You download a piece of software, and then you can start indexing. It's pretty straightforward and easy: you choose the batch you'd like to work on, download, fill in the blanks for the images there, and return it. Then someone arbitrates it and corrects any errors they find. It's free, in that you don't get anything but your own satisfaction for doing it, but if you're a history nerd like me, it's definitely fun to look at the old records and see what was happening.

You have tons of projects to choose from, and they're rated Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced, so you can decide which level you're at. You have no pressure to do a certain amount, and you have a week to do each batch you download, and if you decide you can't/don't want to work on it, you just send it back for someone else to index instead, and there's no penalty. The documents range from census and birth records to more interesting stuff like newspaper birth and obits, and even things like bounty documents. Here is some stuff I have learned so far:

- Almost everyone in 1880s France was was either Jean, Jeanne, Claude or Claudine. And if you weren't one of those, you were Pierre, Marie, Joseph or Josephine, with the occasional Philiberte and François thrown in.
- On South African death records, at least in the 1930s, there was a category for 'deceased's occupation or, if a woman, her husband's occupation', like, if you were a woman, either you can't possibly have a job or if you do, we don't care about it.
- British birth announcements are the most British things you have ever read, at least in the 1930s. It reads something like '17th ult., Mrs George Crabtree, 123 Address street, of a son'. That's the whole thing. Sometimes you get the name of the baby, sometimes the mother isn't even listed as a person and it's 'the wife of so and so'.
- Also, when someone dies, they listed the time and route of the funeral cortege for them, so presumably you can stand along the route. Which is a foreign concept to me, so that's cool information to learn.
- People in Belgium in the early 1900s had at least three given names, if not more, and sometimes up to five or six. And usually one of them was Ghislain/Ghislaine.
- On handwritten documents, where you decide to dot the I is totally up to artistic pleasure, so you can just, apparently, dot it for letters down and make the person transcribing have to hunt down the loop it belongs to.

Anyhoodle, I just thought I'd ramble about this in case it appealed to anyone else out there. I enjoy data entry, history, and names, so this is a perfect storm of a hobby for me.

Jiggety-Jig

Jul. 9th, 2016 11:16 am
awanderingbard: (CP: Brillant!)
Back home from the cottage now! We had an amazing week. It was honestly so lovely and relaxing, and the weather was nice, and we had a nice visit with family, and it was super chill and great. I got some writing done, but not what I was intending to write, of course, and I think it needs a good reworking before it sees the light of day. Anyway, I shall be having a bath in my own little bathtub and a rest in my own little bed, shortly, but if you'd like to see what a very happy Scottish terrier looks like:

Ascii going to the cottage:
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Ascii finding a nice place for a nap:

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Ascii helping Mum do laundry:

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Hope everyone else is doing well!
awanderingbard: (DH: Coming Along)
Hello, all! Happy Canada Day!

I thought I'd do a quick update while I was here, since I haven't been very active this month. My mom is doing great. She's just using a cane now, and she's in so much less pain, it's wonderful to see. It actually made me a little teary to see her walking so easily again. She's having some trouble with low iron/haemoglobin because she bled a lot during her surgery, but that's the only problem that she's dealing with right now, and it's getting better.

We're all pretty exhausted around here, though, but we're off to the cottage tomorrow for a week, which is perfect timing. I've basically been alternating between napping, writing this epic Agent Carter opus that's eating my brain, and binge-watching White Collar and Covert Affairs on Canadian Netflix (neither of which I had seen before, but OMG, I love them both, they are just the right level of what my tired brain can handle in a plot at the moment).

Here's the first half of this year's fic round-up. Hopefully, I will have more stories to post in the next six-month. At the very least, this epic fic should be done. At some point.

Fics! )
awanderingbard: (MCU: Howard Stark)
I've been making Agent Carter icons of late, and so looking through a lot of screen caps, and discovered that Howard Stark's lab in LA has arc reactor stained glassed windows:


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I totally missed that watching the show, but it's cute. I love those sorts of details. I've also picked up that Sousa's office has a picture of him doing military stuff (presumably before he was hurt in the war, looks like him standing on a truck with a unit). He's also a Brooklyn Dodgers fan, judging by the logo on the baseball cap in his office.
awanderingbard: (MCU: Jarvis)
Quick question on Agent Carter canon, though more of an opinion than anything else:

In Season One, Jarvis says he was 'aide' to a General in Budapest. I assumed that he meant 'aide-de-camp', which is a sort of secretarial position, but I recently saw Jarvis mentioned on TVtropes as a 'batman', and that actually makes a lot more sense (batman was a servant to an officer, in charge of running errands, driving him, taking care of his clothing, digging his foxhole in battle, etc.). Did the AC writers use 'aide' so not to confuse American audiences, who probably would have gone to Bruce Wayne at the use of batman? It just makes more sense to me for him to be a batman, and go into life as a butler (historically, batmans often followed their officers into domestic service), than to be an aide-de-camp, which was a very prestigious position, and then have all the skills to be a butler later on.

Any thoughts?

Also, while I'm here, I said I was going to make some Ana Jarvis icons and I did. If any wants them, please feel free to use. Credit to [livejournal.com profile] songstressicons and/or [livejournal.com profile] citadel_icons if you'd like, but it's not necessary. Also, I'm trying to get the hang of a new graphics program, so if anyone would like any other Agent Carter icons, I'm happy to make them if you give me a picture or subject.



awanderingbard: (Dresden: Harry magicking)
Quick health update: I went to the doctor on Wednesday to get the results of my CT scan that I had done in Emerg when I thought I had kidney stones. And I totally had kidney stones, despite what the skeptical ER thought. In fact, I had a 4mm stone and a 2mm stone in my ureter at the time of the CT, which was the day after I went in. And I had hydronephrosis, which is a swelling of the kidney, suggesting that at one point, my ureter was completely obstructed. I'm guessing that was the period of time I felt like my kidney was going to explode. It's also kind of dangerous, so thanks, ER doctor, for not believing me and making me think it was all in my head.

While I've been not well, I've been keeping myself entertained, first with Ancestry.ca's free weekend, which actually led to me buying a month's subscription because I discovered that the stories that my Great-Grandfather had a first wife who left him and was never heard from again were at least partly true! Very exciting stuff. And scandalous: my GGF married the first wife in 1925, and by 1927 my grandfather was born to another woman, so that is a short turn around. Due to the unknown whereabouts of first wife, my GGF and GGM didn't marry for forty years, so scandals all around! And this is not to mention the fact that my GGF was baptized by the priest and listed as being of 'unknown parents'. Now, if I could just figure out how my Great-Great-Grandmother on the other side of the family got to Canada after magically popping up on the 1916 census, I will be quite content. Seriously, Amelia, how did you get here? You sent your son ahead. Then your husband and other two children. I have their boat records. How did you get here?!

The second form of entertainment continues to be Avengers Academy on my iPad. It's really getting fun now. Here are a few screen caps of my favourite things (click and they get bigger)

IMG_0456.jpg IMG_0453.jpg IMG_0451.jpg IMG_0448.jpg
IMG_0443.jpg IMG_0442.jpg IMG_0436.jpg

In order, left to right:
1. Pepper (in her Rescue armor) literally putting out Tony's fires.
2. A statue of Howard Stark.
3. Steve 'bringing back' the Charleston.
4. Pepper looking at files. On the roof. Because she can fly now.
5. Tony testing out his hoverboard.
6. Steve practicing ricochet angles, while Sam, Natasha and Janet dance, and Loki broods at the bar.
7. Tony working with JARVIS.

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