awanderingbard: (Default)
I had a craving for Johnny Cake this week, which is a Bard Family fav. This recipe was lost for several years until it magically turned up in an old desk we were cleaning out to donate. Since we've been having trouble losing recipes of late, I thought it might be best to post it somewhere as a back-up. And to share with the world at large, in case you too would like some Johnny Cake.

Johnny Cake
(from, as far as Mom remembers, the local newspaper a really long time ago)

INGREDIENTS:
1 cup cornmeal
1/2 cup Milk
1 1/2 cup flour
1/2 butter
1/2 sugar
2 1/2 tsps baking powder
Salt (pinch)

DIRECTIONS:

Combine cornmeal and milk in a small bowl, set aside to let the cornmeal absorb the milk.

In the meantime, cream together butter and sugar. Add flour, baking powder, and salt to butter and sugar and mix. Add cornmeal mixture to the rest and blend together. The dough will be very crumbly and dry and look like it won't stick together, but it will when you pat it into the pan. If necessary, add a bit more milk, but you shouldn't need to.

Pat dough out into a greased 8x8 pan. Cook at 350F/177C for 30 minutes.

It makes a nice shortcake for strawberry shortcake, but you can also just eat it as is or put butter and/or jam on it.
awanderingbard: (Dresden: Harry magicking)
Hello! Back for another 'hey, still here' update. We are all still here. Mom's had a bit of a setback in her recovery--it turns out that she did have an infection, plus the haematoma. It was a bit of phone tag, but she finally got some antibiotics and everything is so much better now. The pain is better and the haematoma is almost gone, which they told her would take 6-12 months, so that's a bonus. Massage therapy is wonderful, folks, I highly recommend it for all your ailments. Also tea. We've been using a lot of David's Tea for therapeutic purposes and it's both delicious and helpful.

We were at the cottage last week and had a really great time. My cousin came with her new baby one day and the rest of the time we just chilled. Except for a harrowing drive in the rain back from a massage appointment. It was torrential. We made it through safely because my father is an excellent driver, but country roads and heavy downpours can make for a very stressful drive.

I've been playing a game like crazy lately, called Drawception, and it is keeping me so entertained. I heard about it through a youTuber I like and it's kind of like a game of Telephone/Chinese Whispers. Someone starts off the game, either with a prompt or a drawing, and it's randomly handed off to another player, who has to either draw the prompt or caption the picture, which is then handed on to the next player. No one has any idea where they are in the chain or what else has been written/drawn, so they just have to make their best guess, and the results can be hilarious. Here's a prime example of a mutating prompt: Hummingbirds are the sharks of the sky.

You can get people who suck, of course, purposefully derailing a game or trolling, but on the whole, I've only seen one mean comment in the whole time I've played. People are generally very nice and get along well and don't care if you're a good or bad artist. You don't have to draw, you can skip drawing prompts and only do prompting if you want, or you can just draw and not prompt, or you can do both.

If you're interested in joining, I do have a few tips for newbies:
- You seriously don't have to be able to draw well, stick figures work and sometimes the worse the drawing is, the more hilarious the game becomes
- You have ten minutes to draw. At first, this seems like such a short time, but once you settle in, you'll realize it's longer than you think and you can take your time.
- Don't comment on the drawing quality, good or bad, during the game. It's rude to say it's bad and saying it's awesome puts pressure on the next person. You can leave comments on the game when it's over and that's where you should compliment the drawings.
- There are a few established game patterns you might come across. One is "PIO", which means Pass it On. It's sort of the opposite of the intention of the game, the person who started wants the theme consistent. If you see 'PIO' written on the picture, you should write whatever else is written and add PIO in your prompt. If you see a prompt with PIO and want to draw it, make sure to write it plus PIO somewhere on your drawing. It's not an official rule and you won't be penalized for ignoring it, but it is considered bad form to purposefully derail it.
- Another form of game is a WikiHow game, which someone will start off with a Step One, then next person either prompts or draws Step Two and so on. If you receive a prompt with a Step number in it, draw the NEXT step, not the prompt itself. If you receive a drawing with a Step in it, prompt with the next step, don't describe the drawing. Here's an example of a successful game: Become a Mermaid (Warning for cartoon vomit).
- If you don't want to draw or prompt, you can skip. There's no penalty for it and you can skip as much as you want. If you don't know a prompt or can't think of anything, always skip. Do not derail. Derailing is for jerks.
- There's a lot of running 'jokes' and memes that can get annoying, but you can always skip them. Shrek is an oddly popular meme. And poop. And death. But you'll come across good prompts often enough to enjoy it if all that's not your jam. All games should be SFW unless you opt in to NSFW games. You can report any games which break the rule, there's a flag at the top of the screen.
awanderingbard: (BB: just a yo)
It is an inevitable thing that in this house, if you put a towel on the floor anywhere, Ascii will lie on it. Doesn't matter where. Spill some water in the kitchen and leave the towel to dry it up? Come back and Ascii is lying on it. Her little Scottie brain is sure that it must have been placed there for her, so clearly it would be rude not to lie on it.

A few weeks ago, the dark wood parts of our deck were so hot that she couldn't walk on them to get outside, so I put down a towel she could walk on to get to the stairs (after that it's all light wood, so it was okay. Sure enough, she decided to lie on it. Except, she really took to lying on it. She started to ask to go out just so she could lie on the towel in the sun. We couldn't leave a towel out there all summer, so my dad put down a little spare bit of carpet he puts on top of the freezer to brush her. And now she asks to go out to lie on there. And today I've had to go three times to get her to come in. She just stared at me and went back to lying on it. I've finally convinced her now that she should come in so I can have a nap and not worry about her being stuck out there.

I don't have a picture of her basking, but I do have a picture from a few weeks ago, of her playing nursemaid to Mum. She'd just had a haircut and was shaved down for the summer, but Mum was so hot after her surgery we had the fans blowing on her and the air conditioning going to keep her cool. Which was too cold for Ascii, who was shivering without her fur, but wouldn't get off the bed because Mum was sick and she had to look after her. So we came up with a solution. Here is Ascii, wrapped up in a duvet with a heating shawl over her, lying next to Mum's pillow to protect her:



Also, here she is waiting for Mum to be done her massage at the massage therapists' office:



And utterly exhausted from all her hardworking as a nurse:

awanderingbard: (DH: Coming Along)
Last night, I was sitting in the den, listening to music, with Mom in the chair next to me. I could hear her singing, but it wasn't to the song we were listening to, so I paused the music.

Me: What are you doing?
Mom: *very matter of factly* I'm singing a song about myself.

It was to the tune of Brahm's Lullaby and was about her going to bed. :D

Things are moving along here. We were worried she might have an infection in the surgery wound since it was red and she had a fever, but she saw the surgeon and he's confident it's not an infection. He thinks it's a haematoma and her body is just trying to clear the old blood away. She's otherwise moving really well and the pain isn't too bad, but she's having trouble sleeping on and off (hence the singing of the customized lullaby to herself). Nothing that isn't normal for post-surgery, I don't think.

In the meantime, I've been watching a lot of BritBox, which is a newish streaming service that shows BBC and ITV programmes. I've been catching up on The Last Leg and Mock the Week. And we currently have two different seasons of The British Bake-Off airing here (an older one on PBS and the newest, Channel 4 one, on CBC). So lots of nice, not too involved programming to watch.

And I can read again, which is nice. I couldn't concentrate enough before, but I've managed to get into a book about the history of British manners, of all things, and it's really fun and interesting. Did you know before people said 'bless you' when someone sneezed they said 'Christ help'? And in Henry VIII's time, women were expected to carry a handkerchief in their sleeves, but should have no more than half of it showing, lest it fall out and 'cause a commotion'.

And that's the update for this week.
awanderingbard: (DH: Coming Along)
Mom came home from the hospital a couple of days ago and is doing really well. Turns out the information we got from the surgeon was wrong--she actually bled more than last time (but, you know, he's an ortho surgeon so as long as the bone bits are fine, as far as he's concerned, it went well :-P). But she is certainly not as sick and her blood pressure didn't drop, so she's recovering much better. Also, we didn't know how low her haemoglobin was last time, so we weren't treating it for a few months. This time, we've got her on the blood builder right away. They did a different approach than the last hip, too, so there are different restrictions than last time in what movements she can do and can't do for the next little while. There's more swelling too, but she seems to be in much better spirits than last time.

I've been looking after her and also getting back into doing some graphics-like stuff. I miss my PaintShop Pro, which is Windows only and I'm on a Mac now. I tried the Photoshop CC trial, and OMG, it is soooo much easier to do anything on there than in the other programmes I've been trying. But it's also sooooo expensive. Why did they switch to a subscription service? That's impossible for an amateur to keep up with. Affinity Designer and Photo were recommended to me, and they are one time payments for a reasonable amount of money. Designer I really like. Super easy to use, with even better features in some areas than PS. But the Photo one isn't quite as good for what I want to do. It would be good for icons and stuff, but not so much for painting and drawing, and I haven't quite worked out if I can do what I want in Designer on that front. But we'll see. I have a few options I'm trying out before I make a decision to buy.

In the meantime, I did this watercolour photomanip thing of my vampire, Mat:



It was originally a picture of Tom Mison, which I first manipulated the colours on and then did a watercolour effect over. Learning skills is fun!

Update

Jun. 28th, 2018 02:44 pm
awanderingbard: (DH: Coming Along)
Mom’s surgery went super well. Faster than expected and very little bleeding. I haven't seen her yet, but I talked to her on the phone and she sounds just like herself. Apparently, the coins were a good portent after all.
awanderingbard: (Dresden: Harry magicking)
Back for another 'hey, I'm not dead' update. Basically, yes, I am not dead. I am still here. Still passing kidney stones. Still very tired. But, feeling a little more creative, maybe?

We've had a weird thing going on around here for the last two weeks where Mom and I keep finding coins everywhere. In weird places. Like, on the ledge of the steps of the back porch stairs. And behind a chair in the den. And on the floor of my room, even though I never carry change and no one who comes into my room does either. And on the ground of the parking lot next to our car. And on a ledge by the front door that we just put something on a few minutes earlier and didn't see a coin there. Mom thinks someone on the other side is trying to get our attention. Whatever the reason, it's weird, and I might write a story about it.

Mom is having hip replacement surgery tomorrow, the other hip than the last one. Last time she bled a lot and had a hard recovery as a result, but we've investigated and think we know the possible reasons why that happened and it's the same surgeon and anesthetist as last time, so at the very least, they know what to do if it happens again. She's taking the coins as a sign things are going to go better this time.

Hope everyone else is chugging along!
awanderingbard: (Buzzcocks: Welsh accents are hard)
I got a couple of months of Ancestry subscription to help me peruse my parent's DNA results and to work on the whole 'who is my mom's great-grandmother' thing (talked about here). I still don't know, but I did discover my mom's great-grandfather had a wife none of us knew about before the one we did know about. That side of the family is all from the Eastern Townships of Quebec, which is very close to the border of Vermont and so they often popped down there to get married and I found a record of him and a woman from 1893. It's definitely him, right name, right parents names, close to right age (no one knew how old they were then, as far as I can see), right place of birth (the town still has only 500 people in it, so there's very little chance of it being a name coincidence thing). However, I cannot find any records of the wife beyond the marriage one. Her name does not appear elsewhere, her parents' names do not appear elsewhere, there's no record of her death, I have nothing to go on. I suspect the records are typed from handwritten ones and the spelling is funny on them through a combination of bad transcription and the original person writing down the information trying to sort out French names/accents and using phonetics. I can tell it's my grandfather because I know the names, but without any info on the bride, I can't guess how they might have changed it. All I know is that he married this woman in 1893 and by 1906 he'd married the lady who raised my mom's grandfather. AND, I cannot find him on the 1900 US census or the 1901 Canada census, despite going page by page through the regions I know he lived in.

And let me tell you about trying to find this family on the census! Not only do they not know when they were born, they willy-nilly went by different names and I have yet to see two censuses where the same spelling of the last name was used. It ends in et (making an 'eh' sound). I have seen: -er, -ette, -et, -eau, -ear, and -ier. One of the censuses has none of them using their birth names, but I was able to spot them through knowing their middle names and nicknames. Except for my mom's great-grandfather, who was named Henri but written down twice as Andrew, on two different censuses. None of his names are Andrew, or close to Andrew, or contain the same sounds as Andrew. One sister went by four different variations of her name through her life. And I suspect one sister is written down by her sister's name on one census, but I can't prove it.

All of this is frustrating, but also oddly fun, and keeping me busy. I'm continuing to chill and rest and try to recuperate. My dad's doing a lot better now and my mom has a surgery date for her hip, so hopefully by July or so, at least a couple of us will be on the mend!
awanderingbard: (CP: Noir Arthur)
Here I am to prove my existence once again. Still feeling kind of yucky, healthwise, but maybe a little better. My dad's had some health issues now, in addition to my woes and my mum needing another hip replacement, so Ascii is the healthiest member of the family right now, but we're getting by.

In Ancestry news, my mom's DNA came back, and it was also about what we expected (except more Southern French than we knew about), but with the exciting news that her grandfather, who was illegitimate and adopted, is, in fact, the biological son of the man who adopted him, or at least a member of his immediate family (we found matches with people who were connected to both his adoptive father's mother's and father's lines). We had a lot of family legends around that, and I haven't been able to find anything to link him to a mother yet, but it's cool to have it confirmed he was biologically related to that line of people in some way. I also found out my grandparents were very, very distant cousins, which is interesting. The area of Quebec they came from is pretty small, so it's not surprising there was some crossing of lines there. My mother's side has over a thousand people matched with her DNA, so a lot more people on that side have taken the test, compared to my father's side, who only had about 400 results, I think.

And someone on my father's side of the family (his mother's cousin), got in touch with me and has given me so much information about my great-grandmother's family. Pictures, full biographies, documents, like, just tons of awesome stuff. And he solved a family mystery I've been working for YEARS without success, so that's great to have cleared up for me.

If I can just figure out how my other great-grandmother on that side got to Canada (she is on no boat records, despite the rest of her family being there) and clear up the whole 'birth mother' thing on the other side of the family, I will have solved all the mysteries.
awanderingbard: (DH: Coming Along)
I'd like to introduce you to Mr and Mrs Duck, the lovely mallard couple who come every year at this time to...do duck things in the neighbourhood. Sometimes they bring duck friends. Every day, Mr Duck takes Mrs Duck on a little stroll around the town to gather food and is very sweet with her, like a husband in an old married couple escorting his wife around on a Sunday outing. I took a little video of them today:



In other news, my parents got AncestryDNA kits during their Family Day sale and my dad's results came in today. Nothing too surprising, pretty much entirely Ireland/Northern England/Scotland, which is what we already knew. But there was some Iberian Penisula in there, which is unexpected ('Black Irish'? Though Wiki tells me that's a myth), and 1% Finnish. Vikings, maybe? I dunno. The cooler part was looking at the DNA matches of other people on Ancestry, since my dad's family history is spotty, so it'll be good to have some other people to pool resources with. Still waiting on Mom's. For some reason, despite being mailed on the same day, hers was a week behind his in getting processed.
awanderingbard: (Default)
Remember memes? Remember them? I am going to do one! A generic, non-writing related one, but one none the less. Stolen from tumblr.

5 things you can find in my room:
A bed
tap shoes
a Snowball microphone (for singing)
A stack of writing notebooks
My CPAP machine

5 things you’ll find in my bag:
Sanitary Pads
My wallet
a keychain of key chains without any keys on it
Clip on sunglasses for my old frames (note to self: buy new ones)
Candies for low blood sugar incidents

5 things that make me happy:
Singing
Listening to music
Getting a really good idea for a story
My dog
Having a bath

5 things that I’m currently into:
Knitting with Magic Loop (yay new knitting needles!)
Watching QI on AcornTV
Sleeping a lot
Watching people play video games on Youtube
Vulgarlang.com (it invents languages for you!)
awanderingbard: (DH: Coming Along)
Remember memes? Remember them? I am going to do one! A generic, non-writing related one, but one none the less. Stolen from tumblr.

5 things you can find in my room:
A bed
tap shoes
a Snowball microphone (for singing)
A stack of writing notebooks
My CPAP machine

5 things you’ll find in my bag:
Sanitary Pads
My wallet
a keychain of key chains without any keys on it
Clip on sunglasses for my old frames (note to self: buy new ones)
Candies for low blood sugar incidents

5 things that make me happy:
Singing
Listening to music
Getting a really good idea for a story
My dog
Having a bath

5 things that I’m currently into:
Knitting with Magic Loop (yay new knitting needles!)
Watching QI on AcornTV
Sleeping a lot
Watching people play video games on Youtube
Vulgarlang.com (it invents languages for you!)
awanderingbard: (Default)
Whew, it's been a long time without a post. Unfortunately, my battle with unexplained kidney stones goes onwards, so I've spent a lot of time in the tub and in bed instead of writing. Not that I need to be writing, I just like to be. But I'm still fiddling away with things, so hopefully, a story will come at some point, even if it's just original fic I'm playing around with.

In brighter news, I have lost a bunch of weight since I changed my diet back in July. All healthily and carefully and necessary. I have PCOS, which makes me prone to gaining weight and is benefitted by the loss of it. So, I'm working away and it's going well and hasn't been too hard or unenjoyable.

If anyone is interested, the Mediterranean diet was recommended by a few health officials to me and/or family members, and so far has been working great for us. It's not very strict and gives you lots of options. Even with my tomato allergy, I've found lots to eat that fit the bill.

And it cute news, we bought a new living room chair back in the Fall and Ascii has claimed it in the Name of Scotties, and it hilariously big for how small she is, but that does not stop her from being important on it: (click to embiggen)

IMG_0284.JPGIMG_0283.JPGIMG_0281.JPGIMG_0210.JPGIMG_0209.JPG
Hope everyone else is functioning to their best abilities! Remember to be kind to yourselves! Everyone keeps reminding me of this, so I will pass along the message.
awanderingbard: (CP: Brilliant)
Dropping in to wish everyone who's celebrating/celebrated a very Merry Christmas and/or Chinese Food Day! I hope you had a lovely, stress-free day with family and/or friends, or just had some time to yourself to relax and recuperate.

We celebrated last night and it was really lovely, but today I am super tired from getting ready for it all. We're having a pajama day today, and making our tourtiere for dinner, and tomorrow we're going to my brother's for Boxing Day. Then I plan to sleep until New Year's.
awanderingbard: (Dresden: Harry magicking)
Hola, my Yankee friends! Just dropping in to wish you a Happy Thanksgiving! I hope you have a pleasant, unstressful time in your celebrations, or, if you aren't celebrating, get a few days off to relax. Be careful at those Black Friday sales!

Stay safe!

Sep. 9th, 2017 10:35 pm
awanderingbard: (MCU: Ana & Jarvis)
Been awhile since I posted, I've been chilling with my knitting and crocheting and am starting to feel a bit more recovered after all my health woes. Normal period this month for the TMI win!

Anyway, just wanted to post to say that I hope any and all who has, is currently, or will be dealing with the bad weather stays safe and dry. I'll be thinking of you!

Turkeys!

Aug. 20th, 2017 09:54 pm
awanderingbard: (Default)
I subscribed to AcornTV a couple of months ago, which is a streaming service like Netflix that carries mainly British drama and mystery shows, with a handful of other content. It's been worth it, there's a lot for great stuff on there, and I've been enjoying wading through it.

They recently added an Italian show called Il Paradiso delle Signore, which is based on the Emile Zola novel, Au Bonheur Des Femmes. Both titles loosely translate as The Ladies Paradise, and follow the plot of a department store for women. The Italian version updates it to the 1950s. It's fabulous! The costumes, the acting, the story, everything is really great. The only problem is the subtitles. I am incredibly disappointed by the subtitles. I don't speak Italian, so it's not that I disagree with how they're translated. I'm talking about clumsy, awkward sentences and phrasing, inconsistent translation, and at times hilarious mistranslations, like someone referring to their daughter as their sister, and someone becoming a Doctor Conti for one episode only, when he is Mister Conti in the rest of the episodes. To be fair, he is addressed as Dottore, and I've looked it up and am a bit confused, but it seems like any person who had a degree in the old Italian university system could call themselves doctor, and it might just be another version of Mister? But decide, translators, and stick to it.

My favourite mistake by far is in the second episode (which is way worse than the others I've seen so far), when, for some reason, a character's name, Galli, is translated consistently as Turkeys throughout the episodes. And because he is often addressed in a 'oh, there you are' fashion, it results in a character repeatedly exclaiming 'Turkeys!' for no apparent reason.

What makes this even funnier is, having looked it up, it appears that Galli isn't even the word for turkey, it's the word for hens.

Anyway, mistakes aside, the plot is easily understandable and I've never been confused as to what's happening, but do wish they'd taken the time to translate properly. It's such a good show.
awanderingbard: (Default)
We're in the process of doing a big clean up of the house, especially the basement, which has turned into a bit of a hoarding zone due to all of us being varying degrees of ill at varying points over the last few years and unable to do much more than the bare minimum of keeping the house clean.

My dad brought up a box of stuff yesterday for Mom and I to go through, and inside was some stuff we got when my Nana moved into the nursing home. Including a book in which she'd carefully handwritten all her favourite song lyrics.

For about a second, I thought that was weird, until I remembered that there was no internet to just look up the lyrics to that song if you forgot them. Also, her family was extremely musical, including a brother who played piano by ear, so sheet music wasn't necessary if you could hum the tune.

Here are a couple of pages:

IMG_0156.JPGIMG_0157.JPG

The book was started in 1948, when she was fifteen, and continues until just after my mom was born. Then, at the back, there were three articles that sounded like they were either written for the newspaper or in responses to articles in the newspaper. We have no idea if she ever sent them or what they are exactly, but they are very well-written. A side of her we did not know.

Anyway, last night, Mom and I went through Apple Music and got as many of the songs we could find, totalling a count of 97 altogether, with about five that are lost to history. I put them on a playlist and we're going to listen to them all. Turns out Nana was a huge Nat King Cole fan. We'd also like to see if we can find a way to get the playlist to her, but she's not very tech savvy, and making a mix tape is much harder than it used to be.
awanderingbard: (CP: Brilliant)
Long time no post. It's been sort of A Series of Unfortunate Events around here for the past little while, thankfully most of which have resolved favourably, or are on their way to being good. I'm not good for much these days, but Mom and I have been making some dietary changes, trying to swap out ingredients for healthier versions and eat a bit less, in aid of both our health woes. It's been really yummy! Dad had been doing most of the cooking for dinner and continually making meals that didn't appeal to Mom, who has very low iron still from the blood loss during her surgery last year. So we decided she and I would make dinner, and if Dad wanted, he could share, or he could make his own dinner, and the meals we've had have been really delicious.

Anyway, in my search for good recipes, I stumbled on pumpkin chili. About four years ago, I started reacting to nightshades (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant) and had to cut them out from my diet. It wasn't that big a deal once I got the hang of swapping things, but things like spaghetti with tomato sauce and pizza with tomato sauce and chili was something I really missed. I decided to give the pumpkin chili a try and it was amazing! Not quite like real tomatoes, but a similar flavour, and very satisfying. After fiddling around, I was able to make spaghetti and pizza sauce from it, too, both of which were also excellent. I thought I'd post my method here, for those who also have allergies, or are avoiding nightshades due to arthritis or dietary concerns, or just wanted to try it. It still tastes of pumpkin, so if you don't like pumpkin, this won't make it taste any less pumpkiny. Just more tomato-y.

Tomatoish Sauce Base
1 15 oz/398ml can of pumpkin puree (or pumpkin/squash mix)
1 cup of broth of your choice
Seasoning of your choice (I use garlic powder, black pepper, and salt)
1 tbs white vinegar (optional, but gives it a more 'tomato-y' tang)

Combine all ingredients together, seasoning to your liking. Pumpkin is bland, so prepare to season a lot.

To make chili: throw the base into a slow cooker with some beans, ground meat of your choice (brown it first!), and whatever else you want. Cook on low for eight hours or high for four. I'm no good at serving sizes, but I got three large bowls of chili from it, so it will serve at least three if not more.

To make spaghetti sauce: add a little bit of sugar or sweetener to the base (I put in two tsps), and whatever else you'd like. We use ground beef, mushrooms, and onions, browned together. Add that to the base, and warm over low in a sauce pot until heated to your liking. I got two servings of sauce out of it. We take spaghetti seriously here, you might get more if you don't like as much sauce.

To make pizza sauce: add a little bit of sugar or sweetener. Stick on a pizza crust, add toppings, and follow crust directions to bake. I halved the recipe and got one pizza out of it, so the full recipe should be enough for two pizzas.
awanderingbard: (MCU: Jarvis)
It's Mum's birthday, almost, and we're celebrating tonight, and that means it's time for Rhubarb Coffee Cake, which is a standard Bard Family Birthday recipe. Since we've had a rash of losing recipes of late (where are you, pumpkin muffins?) I'm posting this here both to share and as a back-up if we lose the card.

"Rhubarb Coffee Cake" (from, my mum thinks, the local newspaper)
Things you will need:
1/2 C sugar
1 egg
1/2 C butter
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 C flour
1 tsp baking soda IN
1 C milk
2 C rhubarb, cut in pieces
1/2 C Brown Sugar
1 tsp cinnamon

What you do:

Preheat oven to 350ºF/180ºC.

Cream together first four ingredients.
Add flour, mix.
Put baking soda into milk and let dissolve, then add milk to batter. Mix.
Fold in rhubarb.
Spread batter in 8x8 pan or other appropriate receptacle.
Mix brown/coconut sugar and cinnamon together and sprinkle over the top.
Bake for 40-45 mins, or until the cake is cooked through and the top is bubbly.


NOTES: We substitute Splenda for the white sugar and coconut sugar for brown sugar, which works fine, but may affect baking times, so monitor your creations. You will need something that caramelises for the topping, whatever you may substitute. Frozen rhubarb works great if you don't have fresh. Let it semi-thaw before tossing it in, and the extra liquid while it's baking adds moisture.

We usually have it with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream, but it's also really nice cold for breakfast. It's not a very sweet recipe; the rhubarb gives it a nice tang.

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